Women’s History Month’s significance to Winthrop women

Photo courtesy of Caroline Riggs |  President, Summer Phillips, sits in Starbucks to speak about the club.Photo courtesy of Caroline Riggs | President, Summer Phillips, sits in Starbucks to speak about the club.
Photo courtesy of Caroline Riggs | Summer Phillips sits in Starbucks after her last class.

Photo courtesy of Caroline Riggs | Summer Phillips sits in Starbucks after her last class.

Women’s History Month occurs every year in March, and it is a time where female inventors, artists and historical figures can be recognized and celebrated nationally.

The historical month of dedication and recognition began in 1981 as a week of celebration, but it grew into an entire month of celebrating women.

Many Winthrop students find this month to be important to not only women across the nation, but also to the continued growth of equal rights amongst all people.

“Women’s History Month shows the progression of women over the years. Seeing how much these women have really stepped up, brought [Women’s History Month] to the table and fought so hard so that we get to live how we do now. They keep fighting and pushing forward so that women get to live as humans, and even happy humans, in the future. It’s really awesome,” said Summer Phillips, a junior entrepreneurship major.

“In history a lot of times, it’s been ‘man-ified,’ so a lot of times, people who have made big changes or advancements in history are not recognized because of their race or their gender and that happens very often, sadly. I think that this month of celebrating women’s accomplishments is very important because it gives people an opportunity to learn that not everything in this world that is good was created by a man,” said Abigail Phipps, a sophomore musical theatre major.

“I think it’s awesome that we are able to give certain minority groups the chance to just be in the spotlight for a bit. I think that it’s awesome that we have a month dedicated to women of every shape, size and color in order to celebrate them not for their looks or appearances but for how they changed the world,” said Taylor Evans, a freshman theatre performance major.

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